Op-Ed: The state might not provide a grant to community nonprofits this year. The effects would be painful.

By JEFF SHAW
SPECIAL TO HARTFORD COURANT
JUL 15, 2019

For the past decade, since the recession began in 2008, state funding that community nonprofits rely on to provide services to half a million people each year has been cut in every budget cycle, all while demand for their services has gone up and operational costs have risen.

One bright spot has been the Nonprofit Grant Program. Established in 2012, the program allows the state to bond up to $25 million each year to provide grants to selected nonprofits to pay for programs to lower administrative costs, increase efficiency and maintain high quality services.

There is an overwhelming need for this capital funding. Just one previous round of applications brought in 553 project applications from 285 nonprofit organizations, totaling $101 million in requests for only $20 million in available funds.

Health and human service nonprofit organizations that provide services on behalf of the state can apply for and receive this grant-in-aid for capital and infrastructure projects such as renovating existing facilities, upgrading information technology systems, enhancing ADA compliance, improving energy systems and purchasing vehicles.

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